why are bats stigmatized as being creepy?

ozarkensis:

elfpen:

I mean

look at these things

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they’re like tiny

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fluffy

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dragons

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but instead of breathing fire they squeak and cuddle

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in caves

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and leaves

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and they have funny ears and noses

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I mean really

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bats are amazing

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strangebiology:

The Ankole-Watusi is a breed of African cattle with enormous horns. Like many other animals with headgear, the horns are used for defense, mating, and to relieve their high body temperature. Blood is pumped into the honeycomb matrix inside their horns, where it is cooled off by wind. 

The first photo is by Miloš Anděra.

Three cows (female cattle) in a fight by RLBarn on Flickr. They are only trying to establish dominance, not really hurt each other.

A herd photographed by Charles Hood of Antelope Valley College.

Mama and Calf from Beef Magazine.

Photo by Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher.

Lurch set the world record for largest steer horns. They are 3 feet in circumference, 7 feet long, and 100 pounds each. 

CT Woodie set the record for largest circumfrence of horns in a bull. His horns were uneven and in two out of the three photos I have seen of him, he was standing like that.

(via pricklylegs)

concreteandlight:

Nuts
Location:  Carmel, CA

concreteandlight:

Nuts

Location:  Carmel, CA

(via goodoldfreshair)

nubbsgalore:

photos by mike roberts, masa ushioda, peter liu and doug perrine of green sea turtles being cleaned by yellow tangs, goldring surgeonfish and saddle wrasse. by feeding on the algea and parasites which grow on the turtle shells, the fish not only keep them clean, but reduce drag, helping the turtles to swim faster.

see also: butterflies drinking turtle tears 

(via wolves-whales-and-waves)

orcaobsession:

Killer Whale Surfacing (by Thomas Bullock)

orcaobsession:

Killer Whale Surfacing (by Thomas Bullock)

buggirl:

"I’ve never seen this beetle before. I was wondering if you had any idea? I found it right outside of Boston slowly climbing up a small brick wall. My finger is there for scale."-worstbird
Dr. Hogue, the entomologist at my university was kind enough to email me an ID for this beetle.  According to Dr. H, if you are on the east coast it is likely to be a cetoniine scarab, Osmoderma eremicola.
My research campaign

buggirl:

"I’ve never seen this beetle before. I was wondering if you had any idea? I found it right outside of Boston slowly climbing up a small brick wall. My finger is there for scale."-worstbird

Dr. Hogue, the entomologist at my university was kind enough to email me an ID for this beetle.  According to Dr. H, if you are on the east coast it is likely to be a cetoniine scarab, Osmoderma eremicola.

My research campaign